Mike's Woodworking Projects
Villa Park, CA

I'm amazed that people have found this web site - I'm always surprised when I receive an e-mail from someone who wants to ask a question about one of my projects.  If you found this web site, I'd really appreciate if you would send me an e-mail letting me know you found it and how you found it - from a Google search for something, or from a woodworking forum site, or...  Just send me a note at mike@mikes-woodwork.com.  I promise I won't use your e-mail address or send you any e-mail, unless you ask me a question.  And if you'd like to tell me where in the world you're located, I'd be interested in that, also.  Thanks!

Every now and then, someone contacts me to ask if I will build a piece of furniture for them.  I'm happy to build furniture for clients but the problem is shipping - it's very expensive and is usually a deal killer if you live far from me.  If you write me asking for a price on a piece of furniture, please tell me where you live (I'm in Villa Park, California).

And if you would like to visit my non-woodworking web site, you can find it here.  While this has nothing to do with woodworking, my wife's web site is here.

Visit my "Tutorials" page.  I have tutorials on a variety of subjects.

I now have a "Project Gallery" page which shows some of the projects I've done.

7/22/2016 Here's another jewelry box made from ambrosia maple, but this time I trimmed it in ebony.

5/15/2016 We've been busy with a lot of non-woodworking things and I've only just been able to get back to making things.  This is a jewelry box made from ambrosia maple - lots of streaks and a few worm holes.  I've not worked with maple very much because it's generally a non-descript wood.  But this maple was very interesting.

Anyway, here are some pictures.  First, a front view.


Then a corner view to show how the figure flows around the box

Next, the top.

Now, the inside.

A better view of the tray.

And the bottom.  I had done this compass rose a while back but messed up the border.  So I cut the border off and used the compass rose for the bottom.

2/20/2016  Judy requested that I build a three-legged corner table for a certain part of our house.  To make sure I was building what she wanted, I first made a prototype in ash to work out some of the joinery and design issues.  It really helped.  Here's the table with a coat of shellac on it.  I'll spray a coat of lacquer on it in the next few days.

Here's the prototype:

I fluted the legs:

Making the top was a challenge.  Here's the top in process:

After a lot of hand work with carving tools, this is how it came out.

2/28/2016 A while back, someone gave me a bunch of aromatic cedar.  While I always like to get free wood, it was taking up space in my shop and getting in my way.  Judy, my wife, suggested that I use it to make her a blanket chest, and that's what I decided to do with it.

The basic structure is the aromatic cedar, with figured mahogany veneer covering it on the outside.  The base is solid mahogany.  The hinges are some I found at Rockler.  They hold the lid at any angle and don't let the lid drop - you have to push the lid down to close it.

It's 36" wide, 17 1/2" front-to-back, and 15" top-to-bottom inside.

Here's a view from the front:

A front quarter view to show the side:

And a view inside to show the aromatic cedar.

1/5/2016 Another year!!  After I made the larger dovetail markers (shown below), I made some smaller ones.  These are 1" down and 3/4" deep (on the outside).  I put a few of the larger ones (2" down and 1" deep, outside measurements) in the picture to show the difference in size.  These are 7 degree markers, also.

12/10/2015 I made a dozen dovetail markers from some brass angle.  The markers are cut at 7 degrees.  They'll be used in my hand cut dovetails class.

A view from the side.

12/9/2015 A beekeeper friend asked me to build a solar kiln big enough to put up to 10 full size frames into.  I did some research on the web and this is what I came up with.


The main part of the box is tilted at 15 degrees.  It's lined with insulation which will take the heat generated in a solar kiln.  There's a door on the front to allow access to the pan where the wax is collected.

Missing is the internal metal pan which the wax drips onto. Her husband is a good metal worker and will build that.  She'll paint it.

Next, a view from the side.

And a view with the top open.  I used two layers of acrylic, separated by about an inch on the door.  The door has a support so it will stay open.  Note the frame supported in the box

And a close-up of the interior of the box showing the frame in it.

The interior needs to be painted black to maximize absorption of the sunlight.

9/9/2015 I finished a box for a relative.  It's made of walnut and is about 20" wide, 14" deep, and 12" high, not including the serpentine top.  Here's a front view.  The handle is ebony.  I used the most figured wood I could find for the top.

A view from the corner to show the serpentine top.

A view into the box. I made a shallow tray of aromatic cedar.

A view into the interior without the tray.

And a closer view of the side showing the half-blind dovetails and the shape of the top

8/10/2015 I completed a tutorial on building a basic jewelry box.  The box I made for the tutorial is the one in the following picture.  You can see the tutorial here.



8/3/2015 I finished the corner cabinet.  I finished the top, adjusted the doors, attached the top, put on some small handles and door latches (to hold the doors closed).  I'm generally satisfied with the way it came out.

Here's a view of the exterior of the cabinet, in its place in the house, with a lamp on top.  I put two very small "pulls" on the doors, towards the top.  It's hard to choose a pull that doesn't detract from the veneer design and yet is still easy to use.

A view of the top - without the lamp.

A view of the interior, showing the veneer on the inside of the doors.

7/27/2015 I've been asked to teach a one day class on box making.  Boxes are good for teaching woodworking because you use many of the joints and skills that you would use on larger projects and you don't use a lot of wood.

To prepare for the class, I made several boxes out of pine - just to see what will work well.  Since the class is a one day class, I can't use dovetail joinery because I can't teach dovetails and box making in one day.  So I'm going with miter joints.  This allows the grain of the wood to flow around the box and a glued miter joint is plenty strong enough for a box.  In making the boxes, I varied the thickness of the wood, the way the top goes on, and some techniques for doing some things on the box.  For example, I hand beveled the top on a couple of these and cut at least one on the table saw.  Here are some pictures of the pine boxes I made.

This first box has a lift off top.  The top is held in place by the boards lining the inside which extend upward from the main part of the box.  This box uses 1/2 inch material but it looks thicker because of the lining material.  If this was a "keeper" box, I'd have taken the liner material all the way to the bottom of the box

This next box also uses a lift off top but the top is captured by putting a groove all around the top so that part of the top fits inside the box.  This box is made from 3/8 inch material - which works well for this box.

I also made a lift out tray for this box.

The last box is one with hinges.  The hinges are "stop" hinges that hold the top at about 105 degrees when it is open.  The disadvantage is the cost of the hinges.  This box uses 5/8 inch material, which is too thick.  The box doesn't need that thickness for strength and it makes the inside too small.  However, a box that uses hinges requires that the material be about 1/2 inch to match the hinges.

I made a lift out tray for this box, also.

The decision on what to use for class is 1/2 inch material and hinges.  A woman I showed the three boxes to commented about the non-hinge boxes, "When using the box, you have to find someplace to put the top if you don't have hinges."  Good point!


My projects continue here